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PostPosted: Tue Sep 22, 2009 11:24 am 
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I use synthetic screw compressor oil =)

If you don't know, screw compressors typically use ATF, and I can get the synthetic stuff for the right price :wink:

For 99% of us, I don't think it matters much what you use. The Syn. compressor oil has fixed some nasty shifting in 3 of my Swifts, although new oil of any kind may have done the same.

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 23, 2009 8:22 pm 
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fordem wrote:
climate that varies between 80~95*F.


The word "varies" doesn't belong in that sentence. Our climate varies between -10F and 105F. :wink:

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 24, 2009 10:13 am 
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Location: Minnesota
Nothing wrong with straight 30 oil. They just add polymers to it to get the "winter" rating. When cold, 5w30 flows a LOT more than straight 30, but when they're up to operating temperature, they flow the same. The old hot rod guys are always scared by the "5w" rating saying it is way too thin of oil. A neighbor 2 doors down ran nothing but 20w40 or thicker, in his Chevelle and just wiped out a cam lobe in about 9,xxx miles. A lot of good that thick oil did!

ATF is the factory fill for many manual transmissions. But it would cause my Chrysler 523 to grind on hard shifts

I just broke the 50 mpg barrier. 371 miles on 7.3 gallons. Plus, room for improvement as I've been driving to get lunch at work and the detour on my commute requires a bunch more braking and accelerating than it normally does.

I drove this car over 1200 miles already since I got it running on August 30. If only the head will hold up, this car will be perfect for what I want to use it for. Fingers are still crossed. The oil level has budged, but that's expected. I've added nothing yet.

That wheel bearing noise I mentioned in previous posts has gone away.... hmmm. Cool. Maybe I didn't have the axle nut torqued down right before??


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 24, 2009 8:13 pm 
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Location: Georgetown, Guyana
phantomrt wrote:
Nothing wrong with straight 30 oil. They just add polymers to it to get the "winter" rating. When cold, 5w30 flows a LOT more than straight 30, but when they're up to operating temperature, they flow the same. The old hot rod guys are always scared by the "5w" rating saying it is way too thin of oil. A neighbor 2 doors down ran nothing but 20w40 or thicker, in his Chevelle and just wiped out a cam lobe in about 9,xxx miles. A lot of good that thick oil did!


I think that's kind of backwards - they add polymers to straight 5 oil to get 5W30.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 02, 2009 10:46 am 
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that could very well be. It makes more sense that way to me.

Running better than ever...I think the rings broke in well after about 1000 miles.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 12:07 pm 
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Location: Minnesota
Did about 2000 miles, and its first oil change. The oil was still quite clean, and it consumed maybe half a quart in those 2000 miles. Gonna do a compression test to see where I'm at.


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 1:43 pm 
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Location: Palm Springs: Too hot from June to Oct.!
phantomrt wrote:
Did about 2000 miles, and its first oil change. The oil was still quite clean, and it consumed maybe half a quart in those 2000 miles. Gonna do a compression test to see where I'm at.

Since you've got new rings, maybe no need to do a wet test?
BTW, had great fun yesterday on the freeway with the silver 87 4 door.
A newer Toyota Corolla automatic kept trying to keep up with me for about 10 miles.
Uphill(5 mile grade), into the wind (about 4,000 windmills in that location), I downshifted into 4th and took it to 4000 rpms.
He could only watch me disappear. At the top, I slowed down to 75 mph and dropped it into 5th for the trip down the other side.
When he passed me, he looked and looked. :huh: :huh: :huh: :huh: :huh:
Not bad for an old carb model, and those Hastings rings still seem to be holding up on mine. As time goes on, I find the rings seem to be a bit tighter than before, oil consumption wise... 8) 8) 8) 8) 8)

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Once you get the cars dialed-in (compression, leaks, bearings, alignment, brakes) swap in new rubber and glass, you've got something which should last for years!


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 04, 2009 1:54 pm 
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Haaaaa, ha, ha, ha!!!
I love it Phil N Ed! Way to go showing 'em up like that! :lol:


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 11, 2009 1:41 am 
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Where can I get a tachometer to work with my 3 cylinder? Is there a factory gauge cluster I can install that has a tach?


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 11, 2009 9:25 pm 
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Location: Everett Wa
You can by them here http://www.glowshiftdirect.com/tachometers.aspx

I have there products and they work great ...............

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 11:51 am 
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Location: Rockport, MA
Hi Dale50000,
I like your avatar! It appears to be a '46 or so Globe Swift. I noticed you're into RC flying. I am as well. I've been flying models (as well as full-size) for about 35 years. I recently got into electric planes and nitro heli's. Nice to see a fellow flyer on the forum!
Regards,
Larry


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 15, 2009 12:10 pm 
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I got a 3 cyl dash cluster with tach out of a 3 cyl metro sedan at the junkyard. Aesthetically I like it better than an aftermarket tach. I think the metro vert and lsi models are more likely to have a dash cluster with tach. Just make sure it has a 3 cyl engine. The clusters also changed after 94 so make sure you get appropriate one for your year.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 16, 2009 12:31 am 
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Hello c140flyer

You are correct on the lane..

I still have my GA pilot license, not able to do the RC stuff since I
had a wonderful :roll: :roll: :roll: stroke a few years ago................

Working on my two 1985 Chevy Sprints.... Just did an overhaul on my red one.

Rings, Bearings,Cylinder Head work........ I put on a new to me rear bumper and painted the hood black.............

I have a spoiler that came off a convertible Sprint and I am thinking of putting in on the car............ I also have a pair of running boards I may put on it...............

This will be one HOT chevy Sprint :D :D :D :D :D :D

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PostPosted: Sat Oct 17, 2009 7:02 pm 
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Location: Auburn Wa
I just run the gm synchromesh stuff. $16.00 a quart at the local chevy dealer. I run it in my mitsubishi eclipse too! But Phil N Ed The Penzoil stuff looks to be very similar if not exact. It is $6.99 a quart at Autozone by me. I will try it next time I go to do tranny fluid.

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PostPosted: Tue Nov 10, 2009 11:08 pm 
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still running well. still no oil consumption. Now driving it pretty hard. No problems anywhere


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 21, 2009 10:30 am 
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Still running fine. I'm driving the snot out of it.


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PostPosted: Mon Dec 07, 2009 7:48 pm 
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Location: Victoria BC
Burned exhaust valves seem to be such a problem I think they should have addressd the problem. So many 1L produced for so many years...

I do believe some failers are due to pumped up lifters...
Check valve lash, to get any clearence I've had to loosen the cam and raise it over 1/16" or more. The lifters can go rock solid and stay that way. They are suppose to compress to take up the lash and run quiet, that is why there is hydrolic lifters...no adjustment required.
As a valve wears it recesses into the head, so over the miles you will have less clearence.
Less clearence would make a bad lifter lift a valve even more. When a lifter pumps up and goes solid a valve can burn i a few minutes at high speeds. So if your car even surges on the HWY do a compresion check asap.
I'm not sure if there is a solution out there, I've heard using heavier than 5w30 is the cause
but I think it wouldn't be the cause but it may make it morew frequent. It could be too much viagra in the oil ? :roll: I think I am going to take a bit of the top and machine all the exhaust valves on heads I do, just a bit. Even if they make a tiny bit of noise you know they ain't burnin.

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Last edited by 3cylburner on Tue Dec 15, 2009 4:40 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 08, 2009 12:00 am 
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Read page 3 of this thread. Suprfly specified exactly why the valves fail. It is not related to lifters. Oil consumption due to worn rings causes repeat failures when a new head is installed without new rings at the same time.

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 15, 2009 4:21 pm 
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codyb76 wrote:
Read page 3 of this thread. Suprfly specified exactly why the valves fail. It is not related to lifters. Oil consumption due to worn rings causes repeat failures when a new head is installed without new rings at the same time.


If that is always the case why did my cyl seal after releiving lifter pressure?

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 15, 2009 4:54 pm 
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Location: Victoria BC
most failures? = oil burning but not all.

It is amazing how much crap can build up on the back side of an exhaust valve casing it to stick in the guide or even case a gap in the seat.

My last failure was due to a stuck lifter (stuck at full, and would not blead down) :shock:

Many reasons for these failures?

Retarded timing heat, lean burn heat, oil from various possable causes, rings, guides, pcv etc, lifters, mileage, just a poor seat to begin with, lack of seating or uneven surface area causing hot spots?

There are many a demon umungst us :twisted:

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PostPosted: Sun Dec 20, 2009 11:49 am 
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Location: Minnesota
3cylburner wrote:
Burned exhaust valves seem to be such a problem I think they should have addressd the problem. So many 1L produced for so many years...

I do believe some failers are due to pumped up lifters...
Check valve lash, to get any clearence I've had to loosen the cam and raise it over 1/16" or more. The lifters can go rock solid and stay that way. They are suppose to compress to take up the lash and run quiet, that is why there is hydrolic lifters...no adjustment required.
As a valve wears it recesses into the head, so over the miles you will have less clearence.
Less clearence would make a bad lifter lift a valve even more. When a lifter pumps up and goes solid a valve can burn i a few minutes at high speeds. So if your car even surges on the HWY do a compresion check asap.
I'm not sure if there is a solution out there, I've heard using heavier than 5w30 is the cause
but I think it wouldn't be the cause but it may make it morew frequent. It could be too much viagra in the oil ? :roll: I think I am going to take a bit of the top and machine all the exhaust valves on heads I do, just a bit. Even if they make a tiny bit of noise you know they ain't burnin.


What do you mean by loosen the cam and raise it? The first time I read it, I was thinking that the cam's bearing caps would be loosened and thus the cam can ride higher... but that can't be what you meant. Basically, it sounds like your goal is to get the lash adjusters all the way to their maximum range of operation, and basically live with a little valve lash noise so they can't possibly hold a valve open--like a mechanical lash adjuster.

The solution to my particular problem was the installation of new piston rings--it fixed the oil consumption and brought it down to almost nothing. I am still driving the snot out of this car and so far, it went from about 138,5xx to now 145,8xx in only a couple months with the new rings. Never did a compression check, but its running quite well yet. The telltale sign of the compression loss via burned exhaust valves is failure to idle with the headlights on, the clutch pedal out released, and the heater running.

The valve springs' seat pressure on these things isn't very much, and thus won't bleed an automatic lash adjuster very well.

It didn't require refacing the exhaust manifold gasket surface, it didn't burn a valve because of faulty EGR or PCV functions, lots of 70+ mph driving (I do quite a bit of that) isn't killing it, it burned valves at both 7 and 10 degree ignition timing (memory lacking of EXACT numbers). Fixing the oil consumption and resulting very dirty oil is what is saving the valves now.

In either case, I am now a firm believer that it is a result of oil consumption like some other members said. And coincidentally, when I was shopping around for a cheap beater Metro, I did notice a lot of craigslist ads that Metros with rod knocks, which is, in my firm belief, is also caused by oil consumption and thus starvation.
When the rebuilder who rebuilt this head the last couple times disassembled the lifters, the oil that poured out was like syrup.

My official diagnosis is that either the oil consumption was leaving deposits on the valve seat, and / or the syrup oil in the lifters was basically making them solid lifters that were adjusting too "tight" and not allowing proper valve seat contact.

With an engine that spins as many RPMs (simply due to gearing) and that works as hard as this one, it doesn't surprise me that it needs rings after 120,000 miles. Probably the only way to prove if it is being caused by the lifters or carbon deposits is to take an engine with problems like I had, install a mechanical adjuster somehow, set the lash, and drive it again.


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 20, 2009 2:15 pm 
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I loosend the cam caps till I had a gap under the "flat" side of the lobe, then fed the cyl compressed air through the plug hole. With the cam raised the valve sealed :!:
Like I said in my last post:
And yes you are right, I also now believe oil burning is the biggest problem.
The build up of crap on the stem or seat seems to eventually hold the valve open just enough to get a cutting torch effect through the leak.

PS, I edited my post from most to some. me was wrong. Not sure why I went against the grain :roll: probably the beer on my shoulder (wisperin in my ear) givin me attitude :evil:

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PostPosted: Tue Dec 22, 2009 7:57 pm 
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You don't run it that way, do you?


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 22, 2009 8:17 pm 
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3cylburner wrote:
codyb76 wrote:
Read page 3 of this thread. Suprfly specified exactly why the valves fail. It is not related to lifters. Oil consumption due to worn rings causes repeat failures when a new head is installed without new rings at the same time.


If that is always the case why did my cyl seal after releiving lifter pressure?


I think I get it now. The answer to my question would be "no." But in such a scenario when removal of the lifter allows the valve to finally seat and make a perfect seal, that valve has not yet failed, though it may have been taking a beating. The exhaust valves in my head had no chance of sealing, even with cam / lifter removal. The valve face was no longer round--it was actually kinda triangular-shaped. Gas mileage was probably in the 20's
I literally drove it until it wouldn't start anymore and then some.

I mentioned it before--cylinder #1 never ever failed on me, nor the previous owner. Either that lifter was "defective" and was actually bleeding down even with crud oil in it, those piston rings were still doing their job, or since the coolant comes to that side of the engine first, it kept that part of the head just cool enough to keep the valve cooler, and not melt away.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 22, 2009 9:19 pm 
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Location: Victoria BC
Ya cars can be a "never say never", cars like to prove us wrong just for kicks I think.

Although it apeers to be much rarer than oil related problems I for one know my lifter siezed
in the high pos, rock hard.

:) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :)

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