TeamSwift

Home of the Suzuki mini-compacts ! Your Home for all things Suzuki Swift, Geo Metro, Holden Barina, Chevy Sprint, Pontiac Firefly, and Suzuki Cultus. TeamSwift is a technical performance oriented community!
It is currently Sat May 27, 2017 2:31 pm

Underbody braces, turbos and more!

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 200 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2010 3:57 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 2:16 pm
Posts: 126
Location: Minnesota
Tried some of what?

I'm agreeing on the premature ball joint failure being at least somewhat related to the tires. I drove on them while shaking for quite awhile.

Tie rod ends, however, don't seem to have been harmed. They're still tight.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Nov 10, 2010 5:30 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 24, 2006 3:09 pm
Posts: 4998
Location: Palm Springs: Too hot from June to Oct.!
phantomrt wrote:
Tried some of what?

Since you fixed your engine oil consumption, you might want to try some of this:
(picture below)
Image
-Mobil One EP
-Mobil One oil filter
-Meguiar's supreme shine (spray it on the car interior and the engine hoses. It'll make them look new again.

Easiest way to get the shimmy out of your car (high speed) is to figure out which tire is out of balance.
Switch tires on front, back, etc. until you figure out which one is bad, or have them rebalanced.
Either way, 90% of the time it's a balance issue on the older cars; not much can go wrong with a 155/12.

Past experience has shown me that if you take it to a different shop for balancing, the next shop will find the unbalanced tire in no time. Sometimes it's a wheel, sometimes it's a flat spot or bubble on a tire, but once they're trued, it should run smooth up to 100+ mph.

There should be a laser light level toe in/toe out adjustment on this site which can save you a few bucks on the wheel alignment. It's no fun driving a little car which shakes over 55 mph.

_________________
DIY Broken Bolt Removal: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=41042
DIY Clutch Adjustment: viewtopic.php?f=9&t=48281
DIY Wheel Bearings: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=29003
DIY Shocks: viewtopic.php?f=10&t=45483
DIY Wheel Align: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=42479
Once you get the cars dialed-in (compression, leaks, bearings, alignment, brakes) swap in new rubber and glass, you've got something which should last for years!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Nov 11, 2010 12:11 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 2:16 pm
Posts: 126
Location: Minnesota
The tires balanced out perfectly on the balancer. I'm pretty sure the Kumho's were coming apart internally or something. They lived a tough life and I ran them down until the cords were showing. No obvious bulges. But yea, it was just time for new shoes.

There's still not enough to be said about this car.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Nov 11, 2010 2:15 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 24, 2006 3:09 pm
Posts: 4998
Location: Palm Springs: Too hot from June to Oct.!
I'm going to go out on a limb and suggest the Mods move this to the MK2/3 1.0 & 1.3 SOHC Non-Turbo
section so it'll be easier to find.

phantomrt wrote:
The tires balanced out perfectly on the balancer.

That's why I suggested a trip to a 'competitor' and his machine for the 'win'.
Sometimes tires show up great on one machine, but turn out to be a bit off on another.
I had a high speed vibration which only was resolved after a trip to another machine and operator.
It was frustrating, because the first set of weights were put on by people with great experience.
Sometimes, observation by a second car at high speed (using cell phones) helps.
phantomrt wrote:
There's still not enough to be said about this car.

If you add some sound deadener to the car, your opinion of it might yet improve, as it will be much quieter at speed, and even more pleasant to get that 30,000 miles as you drive your money out of it.

_________________
DIY Broken Bolt Removal: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=41042
DIY Clutch Adjustment: viewtopic.php?f=9&t=48281
DIY Wheel Bearings: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=29003
DIY Shocks: viewtopic.php?f=10&t=45483
DIY Wheel Align: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=42479
Once you get the cars dialed-in (compression, leaks, bearings, alignment, brakes) swap in new rubber and glass, you've got something which should last for years!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Nov 14, 2010 9:14 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 2:16 pm
Posts: 126
Location: Minnesota
The thought of bringing some refinement to this car has crossed my mind many, many times. But its not that bad, or I got used to it or something. I should post some pictures of the car--it is literally a s**t box. It has been crashed (I fixed it to make it pretty straight again), through a heavy hail storm, in the rust belt its entire life, body panels are mismatched colors, etc. I just envision the chassis disintegrating.

If I were to do this again, I'd head south and find a rustless one, weld a roll cage of some sorts into it for a degree of safety, add cruise control, the sound deadener stuff, a tachometer, and drive that.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Nov 25, 2010 11:35 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 2:16 pm
Posts: 126
Location: Minnesota
Replaced a CV axle seal last night. The old seal didn't look like it was very old... I probably replaced it when I had the transmission apart for the synchronizer ring replacement. The leak is probably due to the not so perfect CV axle shaft surface that the seal rides on.

Also did a hillbilly wheel alignment--basically put some boards up against the tires and measured across from the other side of the car with a tape measure. Difference between front of the wheel and rear was half an inch... substantial I'd say. Adjusted tie rods until it measured equally. Also rotated my NEW tires to the front. The other ones appeared to be wearing a bit quickly--probably because of the alignment. Now it goes straight down a snow-covered road whereas before it would suddenly decide to bolt slightly one way or the other probably due to traction differences. These Goodride tires work great in the snow. It only took me a mile of driving last night to say for sure.

So far, I've had:
Arizonian 155 R12: Good treadwear, good in snow, handled fine. Were severely cupped with a flat spot when I got them and then uncupped via controlled burnout. Still held up well. Lived about the same tough life as the Kumho Power Stars... probably a bit worse though.

Kumho Power Star P155 80R 12: Extremely poor snow traction*. Treadwear okay to bad. They were the newest tires on the car when I got it, but the first to wear out. They started to shake like they're coming apart. In either case, they lived a fairly tough life. Least recommended overall.

*Poor snow traction is described as not being able to get ANYWHERE in the snow. With literally a measly 2 inches of snow, let off the clutch at idle, wheels spin and you're stuck. While this is happening, get out and push the car, leaving nobody behind the wheel. Car starts to move on its own, and just gets stuck 5 feet afterwards wheels spinning at idle. Forget it. Useless in snow. Also, pulled out of garage forward into deep snow. Chicken out realizing that you need to get a substantially better run at it. With rear wheels STILL IN GARAGE an vehicle not hung up at all, try to back into the garage. NO MOVEMENT to even begin to rock it. Forget it. Useless in snow!

Winston Sport Metric 155R12: From the junk yard with probably 80+% tread. Wore them down a bit rapidly, possibly a direct result of bad wheel alignment. Okay snow traction. I've had far worse. Worked fine overall. No big complaints.

Goodride 155R12: The only NEW tires so far. Too early to determine tread wear. The best traction so far in snow. When on the back of the car, they exhibited a wishy-washy feeling... inducing a severe oversteer feeling. But then, most NEW tires in my life did this at first. So far, highly recommended.

The car never had a problem hydroplaning, even with baldies on it. Not sure why, but I never had a particular problem with it. The car just doesn't hydroplane unless its in a severe situation such as high speed and really deep water.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Dec 24, 2010 10:07 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 2:16 pm
Posts: 126
Location: Minnesota
If anyone is still subscribed and cares, its up to 164,500 miles, and that equates to about 27,000 miles on these piston rings and its running fantastic and still not consuming hardly any oil. I am at the 3000 mile mark for this oil change, and I didn't have to add ANY and its not super dirty either. I'm *only* doing about 1500 miles in each of the last 2 months, so what they say about people driving fewer miles in the winter months definitely holds true for me as well.

As I've been posting this, its helped me verify how many miles I actually do drive each year. In Aug 30, 2009, I got this thing running and it had about 135,000 miles according to an earlier post, but 137,000 according to my calculation of 11k miles after I bought it with 126,xxx miles. Using 137,000 it equates to about exactly 27,000 miles which is 1,687 per month or so. This equals about 20,250 per year, which is shy of the 26,000 / year I advertise. But I always do have a 2nd insured car which I drive periodically (1 for a backup in the winter, and during the summer a FUN car" and I must have put 4,000 miles on those, plus I have driven other peoples' vehicles some. Its safe to say that I do drive 24,500 a year.

Fuel mileage definitely does tank in the cold with the Geo. I've been getting 42-44 mpg or so, but the high temps weren't getting over 20 degrees Fahrenheit for awhile now.

440 gals/year geo 46 mpg conservative average at 20250 miles a year at $2.75/ gal average fuel cost:
$1210 per year.

750 gals/year backup car say gets 27 mpg average at 20250 miles per year at $2.75/gal average fuel cost:
$2062

$852/year in fuel savings. At this rate, it'll take about 3 years / 60,750 miles for the car to pay for itself, including purchase price and EVERYTHING I have dumped into it ($2600 or so).


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Dec 24, 2010 10:14 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Nov 14, 2005 9:37 am
Posts: 1172
Location: Memphis, TN
I for one am still subscribed. This has been a very informative thread

_________________
94 Swift GTi 5spd
94 3cyl automatic 4 door


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2011 3:22 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 2:16 pm
Posts: 126
Location: Minnesota
Still running great at 166,000 miles. That's 28,000+ miles on the Hastings piston rings that "don't hold up." I am driving it pretty hard, lots of highways, stop and go whatever. Where I go, it goes. Did a 4000+ mile oil change just last week. Again, I never had to add any oil to the engine during that time. I don't think I've added a drop of coolant since I last got this engine put together. I got lazy and quit checking gas mileage lately, but its winter and when it is this cold, it would get low 40's.

I park it in the garage when I am home so I don't have to scrape windows in the morning, but the high temperature earlier this week was -2 fahrenheit and it sat outside at work for 9 hours and started as good as the doctors' brand new BMW's. Funny how one has a brand new Beemer that couldn't get out of the parking lot after a 4" snowfall and I drive right out no problem with 12" wheels. Heh.

This car kicks ass. But the heater kind sucks, and always has since I've had it. Thermostat seems to be working well--it warms up quickly but air out the vents just doesn't cut the cake, though it is sufficient and the gauge goes to about exactly 50% if its range and stays there. I would think this is right about where it should be? I bought a new thermostat ($4.69 or so) but haven't installed it yet. Any other ideas for more heat before I proceed?


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2011 4:28 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jul 09, 2009 1:14 am
Posts: 1889
Location: Prince George B.C. Canada
phantomrt wrote:
This car kicks ass. But the heater kind sucks, and always has since I've had it. Thermostat seems to be working well--it warms up quickly but air out the vents just doesn't cut the cake, though it is sufficient and the gauge goes to about exactly 50% if its range and stays there. I would think this is right about where it should be? I bought a new thermostat ($4.69 or so) but haven't installed it yet. Any other ideas for more heat before I proceed?

Short of a flush or replacement of the heater core, using the recirc setting is the only thing that will increase heat output because it's drawing inside air. You could check the baffle and seals that allow air to bypass the heater core for the cold setting on the controls. They may not be closing or sealing fully.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Jan 23, 2011 11:18 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Jun 18, 2007 1:35 pm
Posts: 2433
Location: Regina, SK
top down@-40 wrote:
phantomrt wrote:
This car kicks ass. But the heater kind sucks, and always has since I've had it. Thermostat seems to be working well--it warms up quickly but air out the vents just doesn't cut the cake, though it is sufficient and the gauge goes to about exactly 50% if its range and stays there. I would think this is right about where it should be? I bought a new thermostat ($4.69 or so) but haven't installed it yet. Any other ideas for more heat before I proceed?

Short of a flush or replacement of the heater core, using the recirc setting is the only thing that will increase heat output because it's drawing inside air. You could check the baffle and seals that allow air to bypass the heater core for the cold setting on the controls. They may not be closing or sealing fully.


I've had heater cores get plugged because of old coolant, and it took basically buying three large jugs of 'aluminum' safe cooling system cleaner, and pouring that in, with the bare minimum Anti-freeze to water, and it was de-ionized water too, for it to finally break apart all the junk in the heater core. So I wasn't getting to experience hypothermia just driving to work or school.

The '93 Metro that is in my sig was the one that required such drastic measures, and it was 30% anti-freeze to the cleaner/water. Don't use Dex-cool in these cars, use either Zerex G-05 or a heavy duty diesel anti-freeze as well.

_________________
My cars:

J. McBean: '98 Suzuki Swift 1.3L 16v SOHC 5sp+ "Mk5" Made in Canada
The Mini Rattler: '94 Suzuki Swift .993L 6v SOHC 5sp+ "Mk3" Made in Canada *The Winter Beater*
B. Berry: '90 Chevrolet Turbo Sprint 1.0L 6v SOHC 5sp+ "Mk2" Made in Japan

I got 18MPG in a 3cyl with a 5 speed manual 4dr, '93 Metro! :yeahyeah


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Feb 13, 2011 8:24 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 2:16 pm
Posts: 126
Location: Minnesota
Yes, the best solution so far has been to put the heater on recirc. It gets warm enough in the car I guess. This was a cold winter even for Minnesota and I can't say its been that bad in the car. I think one big factor is that the car is simply drafty. I got all the doors closing tight but the gigantic piece of swiss cheese sheetmetal on the drivers door probably isn't helping things. (rust) Floorboard is solid, rockers are literally going away. When I first put the replacement door on the passenger side years ago, I very poorly aligned it and there was a huge draft at the A-pillar. Simply fixing that improved things immensely.

I did run the garden hose through the heater core both ways awhile ago and I didn't get any crap coming out of it. It flowed plenty well. As far as there being lots of scale buildup and such, I do not recall any excess amount of that in the engine block, head or even the coolant reservoir. Probably safe to assume not a lot in the heater core as well? I still have not blocked off a bit of the radiator to see if that helps at all.

Today, I installed a used set of control arms. Interesting how the 136,000 mile junk yard ones are in far better shape than the 40,000 mile 3 year old ones. The newer control arms' boots were disintegrated and the joints had play in them already, even though they weren't quite yet doomed for separation. That's quality aftermarket parts for ya! I tried making the replacement joints grease-able by drilling a hole in the bottom of the joint and threading in a grease fitting.. It works, but I discovered that it doesn't work so well on a good tight joint because the joint is actually tight enough to hinder the flow of grease through in it so its like pumping grease into a dead end. Real grease-able joints must have a grease channel or two in them to allow it to flow through.

The drivers' door was feeling like it was about to fall off so I decided to do something about that today. The lower hinge was totally shot. The pin was seized at the bushings so the spline on the pin was actually turning. Very interestingly enough, the passenger side hinges are the same as the drivers side. I replaced the passenger side door with a less rusty one a couple years ago and had a couple leftover hinges from that project. Low and behold, they interchange left to right.

Its still running better than it ever has and oil consumption is still unnoticeable. Mileage is now 167,xxx and I bought it with 126,xxx. That makes for about 29,000 miles on the new piston rings and latest valve job. Coolant consumption is darn near zero. Mileage on the spark plugs and distributor parts are unknown, but has to be at LEAST 50,000 miles. They didn't appear recent when I got the car and I personally put 40,000 on the car. My hillbilly wheel alignment with the tape measure method seems to be working very very well as there is no such excess or uneven wear on the new tires that are now in the front of the car. The left front wheel still has some wheel bearing play in it, but I think that will require a new spindle to fix. There's no noise and its not horribly loose. I'm just gonna keep rolling on that.

The only things left to go wrong that are of any great importance are the pickup sensor, ECU, ignition module, and fuel pump. Hopefully I didn't just jinx myself. I slathered grease all over inside of where the frames like to break, and it appears the grease is at least significantly slowing down the cancer. I'm still glad that I reinforced that when I did.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 14, 2011 6:35 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 2:16 pm
Posts: 126
Location: Minnesota
Up to 173,600 miles. Runs great. Mileage still kicking butt, low oil consumption, very low coolant consumption. It's been very reliable lately.

I may add that last Friday, I needed to pick up a replacement engine for my '03 Sonata. Those 4 cyl engines are pretty rare, expensive, and decent in size. I found one 73 miles from home. So, I tore out the passenger seat and door panel, laid a tarp on the floor, bolted my ratchet straps to where the seat bolts down, drove to the junk yard, and loaded up the engine where the passenger seat would be. The hatch opening wasn't big enough. Then I drove back home with an engine next to me. Haw! It worked PERFECTLY.

There is not enough to be said about these cars.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jun 14, 2011 8:25 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 24, 2006 3:09 pm
Posts: 4998
Location: Palm Springs: Too hot from June to Oct.!
phantomrt wrote:
There is not enough to be said about these cars.

How about: "Cheers!"
Image
:lol:

_________________
DIY Broken Bolt Removal: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=41042
DIY Clutch Adjustment: viewtopic.php?f=9&t=48281
DIY Wheel Bearings: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=29003
DIY Shocks: viewtopic.php?f=10&t=45483
DIY Wheel Align: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=42479
Once you get the cars dialed-in (compression, leaks, bearings, alignment, brakes) swap in new rubber and glass, you've got something which should last for years!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jun 23, 2011 9:02 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 2:16 pm
Posts: 126
Location: Minnesota
I added a tachometer-equipped instrument cluster last night. The 1996 swaps with the 1993. Cool. But the darn new cluster doesn't have the "LOCK DOORS" warning light. I don't know what I'm gonna do!! LOL. And it also has an actual tripometer as well. That means I don't have to trust my brain and/or gas gauge as much and I don't have to record my mileage in my PDA to figure out my fuel economy.

The replacement cluster had 273,000 miles on it! NICE! Took the odometer apart, broke apart some of the tamper-resistant stuff and was able to roll it to match my old odometer. I got it re-installed, and it was off by like 5-6 mph. Then I learned how to calibrate it. Doing so brought it to the max adjustment... or at least the little mechanism inside didn't want to go any farther. But now its within 1 mph throughout the range, according to GPS.

BUT MAN! WHAT A PAIN IN THE BUTT to swap the gauge cluster. I've done a lot of them over the years in various cars, but this one SUCKED the most! It might've been faster to clip all the wires and solder in a 4" extension on all of them. The speedo cable was mediocre in difficulty--the trick is to disconnect it from the transmission and pull it through the firewall. At the factory, I swear the cluster has to be mounted to the dashboard and the entire dash with the cluster goes in all at once.

Also found a rust-free fender at the junk yard. A couple dents, but they'll blend in with the rest of the car. Now the plastic inner fender well will have something to attach to.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Oct 12, 2011 12:33 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 2:16 pm
Posts: 126
Location: Minnesota
I just had to put some more money into it. The fuel filler neck rusted completely off, hence the reason gas poured out when I made a hard right turn. All the others in the salvage yards are in just as bad of shape, so I hacked together one from a 1997 model and the good remains of my old one and boom, no more leaks. I ground rust off, primed and painted it. It should hopefully last another 5 years.

New brakes, front and rear. A pair of closeout RockAuto loaded calipers and new solid rotors for the front and new shoes in the back since the old ones were delaminating pretty badly. I flushed the brake fluid at the same time and the stuff in the rear of the car was super nasty coming out. I can't believe the wheel cylinders back there are still working as a result. Typical of an old car.

New parking brake cables so that I don't have to park it "The gods must be crazy" style.

I tried RTVing the distributor to make it stop leaking. I'm blaiming that I don't have the proper O-ring in there. The seal nearest to the distributor cap is working fine.

My two junkyard tires mentioned in previous posts are history. One of them must've separated and caused a bulge to develop which went bald down to the cords. Interestingly enough, it didn't shake or anything. It just started to lose air at the bulge.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Oct 16, 2011 6:26 pm 
Offline
The mad quebecer
The mad quebecer
User avatar

Joined: Thu Nov 07, 2002 10:06 pm
Posts: 4568
Location: Chicoutimi, Québec
Is that oil leaking from the dizzy?

_________________
Image


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Oct 20, 2011 1:58 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 24, 2006 3:09 pm
Posts: 4998
Location: Palm Springs: Too hot from June to Oct.!
Last year I tried a bit of Mobil 1 5W-30 EP and seemed to like it.
This year, I've been using Mobil 1 0W-40 and also like it. You might check it out.
Not positive, but your Hastings rings are about to fail, right?
:roll:
Not.
If you discount the distributor oil leak, what is your oil consumption with those lousy :P rings and when do you expect them to fail?

_________________
DIY Broken Bolt Removal: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=41042
DIY Clutch Adjustment: viewtopic.php?f=9&t=48281
DIY Wheel Bearings: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=29003
DIY Shocks: viewtopic.php?f=10&t=45483
DIY Wheel Align: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=42479
Once you get the cars dialed-in (compression, leaks, bearings, alignment, brakes) swap in new rubber and glass, you've got something which should last for years!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Oct 28, 2011 9:33 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 2:16 pm
Posts: 126
Location: Minnesota
Sorry... I don't check this thread as often as I should. Nor have I checked to see if I actually fixed my distributor leak yet. It's definitely not leaking into where the rotor and pickup components are, it's not leaking at the "adapter" to the head, so the last place it can is at the O-ring. I'll be popping the hood open this weekend for a looksee. It leaked probably less than a tablespoon of oil a week, but it builds up and... well, rustproofs certain things.

The engine has started consuming a bit of oil, which is expected. After all, it does have over 40,000 miles on the rings already. It is running great. For some reason the mileage has dropped to the mid-40's. I never achieved 50 mpg all summer long. It could be my stressed life and resulting driving habits for all I know. The ignition components were all of unknown and questionable age when I got the car 53,000 miles ago, so that may be a factor as well as the gas leak out the filler neck. This car goes through wind, rain, gravel, snow, stray bullets, and it holds up. As cheap as these cars are, they seem to have quality where it counts the most.

But, ya know, the rings are holding up fine. Especially considering that this engine had .004" of cylinder wall taper, which is substantial. It undoubtedly has another half thousandths of wear now.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2012 6:58 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 2:16 pm
Posts: 126
Location: Minnesota
The distributor leak has been stopped. It was being caused by the O-ring where it enters the head. I didn't have an appropriate O-ring in my set, so I used RTV around the distributor. Now the ignition timing isn't adjustable without breaking that seal. Oh well I guess.

It is up to 186,xxx miles now. I had to throw in new spark plugs / cap / rotor since it started an occasional misfire. The plugs were questionable at 126,xxx miles so I am not doing too bad there. Oil consumption is still very much negligible.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Sep 07, 2012 11:25 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 2:16 pm
Posts: 126
Location: Minnesota
I've been spreading the miles out on other vehicles lately, but I am up to 192,xxx miles now. It is running/driving great. Upper 40's for fuel mpg. Not many problems. I have another $13 rear wheel bearing roaring away (probably due to an improperly sealing dust cap again) and the muffler seems to be rattling internally, which doesn't surprise me considering that I've welded a patch over a gigantic hole that developed in it.

As a side humor note, I've mentioned many times before about how bad the car looks being rusty, dinged up, multi-colored, etc...

At my work, a patient managed to get the pedals confused and drive her Mazda through an aluminum fence and off of a 10 foot high retaining wall. Thankfully, nobody got hurt and the damage was limited to just the fence and the car. We got the boom truck out there to hoist the car out and all went well, but there was now this 15" long section of fence that was destroyed. I parked the Metro sideways in the parking spots that were perpendicular to the damaged fence, simply to thwart people from parking there while I built a makeshift fence with some yellow rope just to hopefully keep some wandering kid from plummeting off of the retaining wall. After I was done, I just left the car there. Why not? Parking wasn't at a premium that day.

ALL DAY LONG, PATIENTS WERE COMING IN AND ASKING OUR STAFF IF IT WAS MY CAR THAT WAS RECOVERED FROM BELOW THE RETAINING WALL and if it was stolen, etc. Because, after all, the car kinda looks like it just crashed through a fence and went off of a wall. It made for a whole lot of laughs.

But, on the upside of things, it runs and drives a million times better than it looks. Original shocks/struts all work great yet, speedometer is accurate, window scrapers are good.... these cars actually have some quality where it counts.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Nov 22, 2012 8:08 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 2:16 pm
Posts: 126
Location: Minnesota
For those still subscribed!

Still running strong. I went about 5,000 miles on my last oil change and it consumed about .5 to .75 quarts of oil. Total mileage is 196,6xx. The muffler which I so proudly patched up went to hell already so I finally broke down and just bought a new one.

A deer jumped out and nailed the side of the car earlier this week. The front fender got smashed in a bit and it spun around, missed the door and mirror, and got the rear quarter panel as well. I popped the dents out the best I could without spending any significant amount of time on it. It is convenient for there to be rust holes in "strategic" locations which made it easy to get a pry bar behind the rear quarter to push it back out. That and with significant rust and thin metal to begin with, it bent back quite easily. Too bad, since I believe this is a car that deserves better, but one of the reasons I have it is because when things get dented or whatever, I can say that I do not give a flying **** and sleep well that night. The body of the car is beyond ever making nice again unless you are ambitious enough to replace rocker panels and rear quarter panels, etc.

After the deer bounced off of the Metro, an oncoming car in the other lane came and pulverized it.

Next issues I am predicting are the alternator and fuel pump... just because of the age and mileage.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 23, 2012 3:07 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 24, 2006 3:09 pm
Posts: 4998
Location: Palm Springs: Too hot from June to Oct.!
I'd stock an extra water pump as well.
Otherwise, keep driving your money OUT of it.
She smoke any?

_________________
DIY Broken Bolt Removal: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=41042
DIY Clutch Adjustment: viewtopic.php?f=9&t=48281
DIY Wheel Bearings: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=29003
DIY Shocks: viewtopic.php?f=10&t=45483
DIY Wheel Align: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=42479
Once you get the cars dialed-in (compression, leaks, bearings, alignment, brakes) swap in new rubber and glass, you've got something which should last for years!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Nov 28, 2012 2:39 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 2:16 pm
Posts: 126
Location: Minnesota
I forgot to add that I also tossed in a new oxygen sensor a few thousand miles back. The previous one was actually for a '98 GM "quad-4" engine. The wire was stainless, so I couldn't solder it so the wires were just twisted together. It was getting lazy and result in a very minor drivability issue on a mediocre warm engine and would throw the CHECK ENGINE light on and off. I figured I'd just throw a $13 wholesaler closeout sensor at it. No improvement in mileage for what its worth.

I just noticed a puddle under the car today at work--a heater hose is leaking at the clamp. I guess its time for all new bypass and heater core hoses all around. Those hoses are only 20 years old. I'll be taking the radiator cap off as I drive home tonight to make sure it doesn't rupture. The big radiator hoses are only 5 or so months old.

The water pump was changed somewhere around 135,000 miles and I am almost to 197,000 now. That should be good to go. No smoke at all, clean exhaust, starts strong, no valve failures of any kind anymore. No coolant consumption (other than the leaks I mentioned). And I drive the snot out of it, including plenty of 80+ mph "blasts" down the freeway. I've said it many times before, but if you burn up valves, be sure to remedy whatever is turning the oil dark quickly, and make sure to change your oil, too!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Nov 29, 2012 11:24 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Feb 24, 2011 10:53 pm
Posts: 645
Location: brainerd MN
My two Bits. Back in the day. I sold an older lady (A Friend from church) a new 91 Metro with the 3cyl. 5speed. at a little over 1 year, and with just under 9000 miles on it, the head had to come off, Burned exhaust valve in Cyl. #2. (warranty fixed her problem.) As a point of conversation, It was determined that she had been feeding it premium fuel, and was an early shifter (Lugged it down into a lower gear as quick as possible) In a effort to get the rpm's as low as possible,As soon as possible, for max fuel economy. She was advised by the GM service rep.(Who Came up from the GM Headquarters) to feed it the cheapest gas available at the pump. (lowest octane) and to rev. the heck out of it (And I Quote)
Like you would a Honda. He further stated that this problem was not common, But it also was not unheard of either.(Bare in mind, the metro had only been around for about three years at the time.) He further stated, That to his knowledge, none had ever occurred in a car equipped with the automatic Transmission. With his supposition Being that the Automatic forced the motor to rev higher before it shifted.
Since that time, I have stumbled into several Metro's with a weak #2 Cyl. All stick-shifts I Have a 99 motor sitting on the floor in back, that I don't know what to do with, it has 165,80,140 compression with only 110k on it. :( ) and never had a bad engine when a swap was required, if the donor motor was obtained from a car with an automatic.
Just some fuel for discussion, Your mileage may vary. My experience may be unrelated ,but I hope it helps. Best wishes each, Jonathan

_________________
Current stable:
1987 Sprint Turbo (Porsche Guards Red) 75k 5sp,AC, w/cruise, Resto-Mod,owned since 1997) (looking for dash-pad)
1989 GTI (white)104k 5sp,AC (Resto-mod completed 1999). (looks great, But rusted out ,need clean southern body.)Help!?
1991 Vert (red) 129k 5sp,AC, Resto-Mod, 75% Done.(Clean SW car)
1993 GT(Teal) 103k 5sp,AC,w/PW (Resto-Mod,60% done.)(Clean SW car)
1994 Swift GS 4Dr sedan (Painted 2005 Ford Kona Blue) 95k 1.3 SOHC 5sp


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 200 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group