TeamSwift

Home of the Suzuki mini-compacts ! Your Home for all things Suzuki Swift, Geo Metro, Holden Barina, Chevy Sprint, Pontiac Firefly, and Suzuki Cultus. TeamSwift is a technical performance oriented community!
It is currently Sat Nov 18, 2017 6:35 pm

Underbody braces, turbos and more!

All times are UTC - 5 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 65 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Thu Mar 31, 2011 9:44 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 9:07 pm
Posts: 557
Location: alabama
Ive been on here for a few weeks now. Lurking for a bit before that.

Many years ago I owned an 87 sprint that I Put over 300k flawless miles on. Soon after I sold it I hated that I did. For years since then Ive been looking for another.
I had been looking in the southeast for about 4 years for a suitable candidate, 4 door early version sprint. Biggest problem in my part of the country is finding any of them at all.
What I stumbled on to was a true 1 owner, 152K miles, 4 door sprint plus,factory AC. The only negative is of course the automatic transmssion that no body cares for. Zero rust, which is quite rare for a southeastern car of this age. However the owner kept it garaged until about 5 years ago which no doubt helped. Of course like so many, I was able to get it for a song due to the fact it was running like crap.Actually not running at all the day I looked at it. I did have to trailer it home, but had it running in about 5 minutes the first day I found time to tinker with it. Head gasket was noticeable blown due to oil in radiator, but luckily no water in crankcase. I shortly drove it around my property then put it in my shop. Sorry folks, but didnt manage to get any pics of engine bay prior to removal of engine. It had been leaking out the head gasket for so long the entire engine bay was a solid clump of grease.

My plans are for an all out full restore. To start with a complete top to bottom engine rebuild. Rebuilding with intent of max fuel economy. Aside from tons of new parts, Ive taken advantage of Mike Coves 3tech cam service, to have my cam repaired and a more eco greind performed. I'll try my best to do a good detailed thread, as like myself, many see these forums and informational learning tools.

For tonight here is a taste.

Image

Image

Image

Image

_________________
Mike
Valley Grande, AL
1986 Sprint plus

Do you maintain a personal fleet like I do?
Why do we do it?
Because it's what we enjoy and because we CAN.
2011 camaro, 2005 Vibe, 2016 Outback, 06 Expedition, 87 Porsche 911, 87 Turbo sprint, 82 Brat, 73 gmc 4x4, 69 camaro, 99 Gl1500 Honda Goldwing, 12 Kawasaki klr650, 2012 Kubota L3200, and we wont even go into the small stuff.


Last edited by mkc1962 on Mon Sep 26, 2011 4:09 pm, edited 6 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Mar 31, 2011 10:11 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 28, 2011 8:58 pm
Posts: 40
Location: Montana
nice sprint, i was lucky enough to find a 87 2 door as well with zero rust. Just got the new motor in and already got 500 fun miles on it. ill post pics probably tomorrow of my ride

_________________
WD-40 & Duct-tape: For when it moves and it shouldn't....And for when it don't move and it should.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2011 12:27 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 9:07 pm
Posts: 557
Location: alabama
So far, 156,000 mile teardown. As stated earlier I did not take very many pictured during the greasy tear down, so limited shots of that.

engine has been completely removed and fully disassembled. It was noted that all 3 engine mounts will need to be replaced. Entire engine bay was degreased. It was also noticed that inboard boot on PS cv shaft is torn. Tranny other than filthy appears to be intact. I do plan to remove for through cleaning along with replacing all in and out seals.
Blown head gasket was obvious. Head and valve train showed very little valve wear on the valve face area. Not like so many others that are found with burnt valves. valve margins were a bit thin, so I chose to replace all valves/keepers. On the top side, avg darkening of all parts as to be expected, but no sludge at all, the cam lobes had some wear with the worst wear on the fuel pump lobe. Valve adjustments were found to be near at spec. All valve springs checked to be ok. Valve guide lateral play was only very slightly visible on #3 exhaust, but also within spec. Due to the visible wear, the cam is not in the condition I would care to be using. Cam was sent to 3Tech for reworking and IF possible a more economy grind.

Image

Image

PVC valve and associated piping was clogged up solid. Another common problem with these.
Starter was clicking prior to tear down. Installed new solenoid contacts as per advice here.

http://www.nationsautoelectric.com/instructions.html

Alternator is new.

AC system I’ll worry about after back to running and reliable. All parts are present, Slight pressure on low/suction side schrader valve. Old R12 system will upgrade to 134a at that time.
Due to the oil that was present in the cooling loop, Rad and heater core will be thoroughly cleaned and tank checked for leaks. Every piece of rubber under the hood will be replaced NEW.
Rod bearings showed very slight wear, but nothing major, same on the main bearings. Rings all looked intact, none were stuck. Regardless, my plans are for all new bearings and rings. Crankshaft looked perfect. Will light polish it prior to reinstallation. Plasti-guage will be used on all new bearings to check for proper clearances. All rod bearings and crank main journals were inspected prior to disassembly for runout end play. All were well within spec. I also plan to balance the pistons, as suggested by Phil n Ed in this writeup

viewtopic.php?f=2&t=40445&hilit=balance+piston

All parts were fully disassembled, and those needing cleaning were soaked in “SIMPLE GREEN” for numerous days until near spotless.
Block was thoroughly cleaned. All threaded holes tapped, and the cylinders honed.

Image
Image

Same was done with the head and all its pieces. Rocker arm contact pads were lightly buffed to remove any visible wear. New screws for rocker arm shafts. I decided to go ahead and do a light cleanup/polish work on the head intake and exhaust bowls and runners. Bowls were blended, and runners cleaned up of any casting marks. Intakes left rough, exhaust polished to as slick as I could achieve. Combustion chambers also polished. All new valves were also polished. Head reassembly was started only to find out I had improper keepers.

Image
Image
Image
Image
Image

All parts for an entire rebuild were ordered from Parts Dinosuar. Full gasket sets, head bolts rings, bearings, valves, water pump, oil pump, timing belt and tensioner. Everything else, local parts houses.

Image
Plans are to also rebuild the carburetor, due to its age, Hitachi feedback type. Thanks to Phil n Ed, for all the shared info and assistance in finding some of the harder to find parts like the MCS.

Watch for updates.............

_________________
Mike
Valley Grande, AL
1986 Sprint plus

Do you maintain a personal fleet like I do?
Why do we do it?
Because it's what we enjoy and because we CAN.
2011 camaro, 2005 Vibe, 2016 Outback, 06 Expedition, 87 Porsche 911, 87 Turbo sprint, 82 Brat, 73 gmc 4x4, 69 camaro, 99 Gl1500 Honda Goldwing, 12 Kawasaki klr650, 2012 Kubota L3200, and we wont even go into the small stuff.


Last edited by mkc1962 on Sun Apr 10, 2011 8:36 am, edited 1 time in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Apr 09, 2011 2:11 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 9:07 pm
Posts: 557
Location: alabama
As I am still waiting on the arrival of a few major engine components,
I figured why not go ahead and get everything else clean and/or rebuilt.
Probably the most labor intensive small item rebuild, on any such engine
would be the carburetor.
Oh sure one can buy a rebuilt unit for $250 to $500, but most would refuse to pay that
for just one piece of a car, when the entire car only cost them maybe that much.
That and if you do, are you really sure it was done right.
In the case of these tiny cars carbs,
if you are going to restore something right and mostly plan to depend on it,
one doesn’t have many choices.
Folks that actually do carburetor rebuilds, in this day and age, are a dying breed.
I’m nowhere near dying that I hope, but have had the good luck to be rebuilding carbs for about 35 years.
My choice was obvious.
To the extreme younger DIY crowd, many (not all) that don’t even know what a carburetor is other than a word, maybe one day this info might be useful to you.
After all, that is what places like this are for, sharing the knowledge.
I’ll not go into every single step here, but try to highlight on those that I just have not
seen often documented. There are many excellent info threads here already.
And of course the often referred to carb manual found at this link.

viewtopic.php?f=8&t=38513

First an off the bench rough cleaning always seems to make things easier.
I find that Simple green or similar works nicely.An old toothbrush, or any other type of brush also aids in this.
SG also aids in being enviro-safe along with not as harsh on the health of the user.
Not to say that I don’t use aerosol carb cleaner as well, but limited use.

Image


Some other nice to have items are, carb soak, and a few special tools.
Regular hand tools will suffice, however the screws on these old carbs can be a bear to remove and not totally destroy.
An impact driver is a carb builder and motorcyclists friend.
The smaller jets also are near impossible to remove unless one has modified a screw driver.
Specific jet removal tools are obtainable through many tool sources.
Ive had mine for over 20 years and use it several times a year.
Of course, unless just totally gummed up,though I would not recomend it,
many jets can just be left in place.
I myself prefer to remove anything I can.
In addition of course is a proper rebuild kit, and highly recommended is a new MCS (mixture control solenoid).
Phil n Ed here on the forums, has a source for these and can possibly assist you in obtaining one.
It’s been said that the life expectancy of these is approximately 150k miles.
Let your knowledge of your actual carb be your guide.
Easy to replace now, not so easy later when its running like crap.

Image

Prior to disassembly is a good time to vacuum test all vac pots.
By doing so now it shows you if each was actually coming in contact with its designated path or moves its associated linkages properly.
Testing of the the two electrical solenoids, BVS (bowl vent solenoid) and fuel cut solenoid are more easily tested after removed. As are the two micro switches.

Image


After removal of all external vacuum pots, linkages, wiring etc, this might be a common sight once the top and
Bottom are seperated. As one can see, there was definitely some obvious wear and gunk within my carb.

Image


One often forgotten step in many carbs is any screw that might be hiding behind a blank plug or cover plate.
In the case of these Hitachi carbs the air mixture screw is one of these such items.
Prior to disassembly of the carb the picture on the top shows it in its well hidden state.
After disassembly this is easiest removed by installing base of carb in a vice or similar.
Using a 3/16” drill bit slowly remove the brass pin as depicted using the yellow lines in the picture below.

Image


Upon removal, you will find what once was a 3/16” x ¾” long brass pin.
Most would never reinstall this after a rebuild. However, if you are a brand purist, or a glutton for punishment,
I have taken the time to measure if for you for accuracy.

Image


After this blocking pin is removed, the mixture screw can then be removed.
It would be wise to measure how far it is installed, as a reference point for reinstallation.
Mine was found to be 2 turns in. In addition to the screw there will be a metal washer
and a rubber sealing ring at the bottom of the hole. The sealing ring in mine was much larger than the avg o-ring.
The o-ring in the rebuild kit was at best 1/3 as thick. Keep this in mind when doing the readjust later.

Image


From here, continued disassembly down to the last part. All items cleaned in the fashion you desire.
I choose the soak approach. However, keep in mind, the soak is not a leave it in there forever thing.
The carb cast parts do have a protective coating that can be removed if over abused.
I personally soak my stuff for about 2 hours.
I have never in all my years removed a finish with that amount of time.
Note, I have been using the same can of carb soak for over 15 years, and countless carbs.
Unless I lose it or misplace it, I will probably use this can for near that much more.
Well worth what you pay for it (approx. $18 at most any parts house)
It comes with a nice metal bucket for all the small parts
.
Image
Image


Upon initial reassembly, but before installing the MCS ( mixture control solenoid)
and the accelerator pump, it pays to check the needle/seat and float for proper float bowl gas level.
I have been told that the newer rebuild kits needle/seat are different than oem and that the
float will need to be adjusted for proper fluid level. Luckily I had on hand an NOS rebuild kit with
identical to new parts and mine required zero adjustment. Using Phil n Ed’s DIY approach
this is the way I checked mine just to be sure.
Proper setting is ½ of the sight glass. The actual site glass has an etched dot in the center.
In addition the outside housing has the two metal tabs to depict 1/2 as well.

Image


After this, final reassembly may continue. Once you are finished, what you have is something
much more reliable than what was removed. Not to include the pride of having done it yourself for a fraction
of the cost of store rebuilt.
There are several more things to check prior to install
and actual usage, all found within the carb manual. Most, unless the carb was just violated to no
end, will be set as they should be for proper operation. But, do take the time to check them.
(linkage adjusts, butterfly gap,etc)

Image
Image
Image
Image


I hope readers of this find this beneficial.
The restore continues…………………….

_________________
Mike
Valley Grande, AL
1986 Sprint plus

Do you maintain a personal fleet like I do?
Why do we do it?
Because it's what we enjoy and because we CAN.
2011 camaro, 2005 Vibe, 2016 Outback, 06 Expedition, 87 Porsche 911, 87 Turbo sprint, 82 Brat, 73 gmc 4x4, 69 camaro, 99 Gl1500 Honda Goldwing, 12 Kawasaki klr650, 2012 Kubota L3200, and we wont even go into the small stuff.


Last edited by mkc1962 on Sun Apr 10, 2011 8:38 am, edited 4 times in total.

Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Apr 09, 2011 9:44 pm 
Offline
Island Inbreeder
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 18, 2005 6:56 pm
Posts: 6347
Location: Emerald city Washington
good post alot of guys screw the ends up removing the electrical conectors from there harnesses
I just have a question if you reused the MCS how did you determen if it was fully operational.?
also with 156,000 on the clock these carbs wear around the shaft and have air leak.?
also the micro switches need to be serviced did you not have a problem with your switches .?
a member here had a nifty little trick on tune up the micro switches by removing material arond the switch
.
here's the thread for the Factory Service manual
.
viewtopic.php?f=8&t=38513
.
.
........JV&S
.
.
.
.
.
.

_________________
.

t3 ragtop wrote:
the 3 banger isn't at all a "grenade." it's a tough little son of a bitch doing a big job. respect it.
suprf1y wrote:
I didn't save anything.Vehicles are to me, like little boys are to Tommy.Toys to be abused for my own personal pleasure.
jrjd wrote:
"Driving a Swift GTi is like driving a bike in your house".


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun Apr 10, 2011 8:22 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 9:07 pm
Posts: 557
Location: alabama
jaguar,vettes&sprints wrote:
good post alot of guys screw the ends up removing the electrical conectors from there harnesses

Thank you. Yeah, ive known quite afew that would just cut multi connectors and then either solder the wires back or place inline disconnects. Heck, many a moon ago I'd done it also.Not that it wont work if one takes the time. But, my first profession, 30 years ago was as an electronics service technician. The last few years alot of time was spent in the multi connector field. Due to that I accumulated alot of nice to have service tools for such things. My long time hobby of auto repair and restoration didnt hurt matters either. That being said, I aquired these two items, which make working on WeatherPAk connectors and the like much more easy. However at the moment I was out of the pins. In the case of my "NEW" mcs I reused the old pins via a solder joint at the base for the pin.
Image

I just have a question if you reused the MCS how did you determen if it was fully operational.?

Sorry if I mislead. I chose not to resue the old one due to age alone and was able to aquire a new one. From all Ive read and been told the only known way to test one is to feel the side of the carb for vibration with the ignition on, and the 2 wire terminal adjacent to the battery crossed out. As I had already removed my carb this was not feasable. I was never able to clearly find out if it was 12vdc or maybe an ecm control voltage of 5vdc that triggered the thing to do a bench test. Even then you can not be sure it might not be gummed up in some way.

also with 156,000 on the clock these carbs wear around the shaft and have air leak.?

Point well made, and no real way of knowing such until its rebuilt and back on. I did attempt to find any lateral movement in my shafts and could not detect any. As well using compressed air and soapy water attempted to find any slight leaks that way, but also could not see any visible. As my last Sprint I went over 360k miles and that never was a problem, I just put a bit of faith in this one. I am told that the bases can be rebushed if needed. I do have a close friend that loves to turn things on his lathe, so if that presents itself I'll just get with him and have him make me a few bushings.

also the micro switches need to be serviced did you not have a problem with your switches .?
I checked the switches for activation prior to disassembly and the linkages did engage them. Upon disassembly I checked each with a DVM and both checked ok.

a member here had a nifty little trick on tune up the micro switches by removing material arond the switch
Yes Ive seen that thread. However, similar micro switches are avial through various electronics supply houses. And maybe some here have already attempted such , I dont know. I am by no means against modifying things to make them work, but IF I could find a simiarl switch I'd rather jsut try and replace them first. Another trick Ive seen used many times back in my electrical maint days, on micro switches with worn pads was, take a drinking straw (or anything plastic) and a cigarette lighter, or in the case of the day your soldering iron. Melt some of the straw, and dob a bit of the molten plastic on the swtich pad, to sort of build its surface area back up. This of course is only a fix for if the pad is worn, not an internal elec issue.

.
here's the thread for the Factory Service manual

I saw that mistake and have corrected it, thanks!!.
viewtopic.php?f=8&t=38513
.
.
........JV&S
.
.
.
.
.
.

_________________
Mike
Valley Grande, AL
1986 Sprint plus

Do you maintain a personal fleet like I do?
Why do we do it?
Because it's what we enjoy and because we CAN.
2011 camaro, 2005 Vibe, 2016 Outback, 06 Expedition, 87 Porsche 911, 87 Turbo sprint, 82 Brat, 73 gmc 4x4, 69 camaro, 99 Gl1500 Honda Goldwing, 12 Kawasaki klr650, 2012 Kubota L3200, and we wont even go into the small stuff.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Apr 20, 2011 11:13 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu May 12, 2005 11:36 pm
Posts: 133
Location: Winnipeg, Manitoba
mkc1962 wrote:
I hope readers of this find this beneficial.
The restore continues…………………….


Looking real nice and tidy; I like the care and attention to detail. I just got back a MK1 that's been in and out of my possession over the past few years, it's rough enough to not want to keep it right now, but seeing/reading this gets me to thinking I might regret getting rid of it later and maybe fixing it is a good choice :).


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Apr 20, 2011 11:41 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 9:07 pm
Posts: 557
Location: alabama
I wore those same shoes about 15 years ago....it was not soon after it left I hated ever getting rid of it. Ive looked for another for years. Id hold onto it, and just get to it when I could.

_________________
Mike
Valley Grande, AL
1986 Sprint plus

Do you maintain a personal fleet like I do?
Why do we do it?
Because it's what we enjoy and because we CAN.
2011 camaro, 2005 Vibe, 2016 Outback, 06 Expedition, 87 Porsche 911, 87 Turbo sprint, 82 Brat, 73 gmc 4x4, 69 camaro, 99 Gl1500 Honda Goldwing, 12 Kawasaki klr650, 2012 Kubota L3200, and we wont even go into the small stuff.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sun May 22, 2011 7:47 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 9:07 pm
Posts: 557
Location: alabama
About time for an update. Spring has kept me busy working/traveling and other major project. But, the sprint get a little attention just about every day off.
The head was finally put back together.Fully cleaned. Combustion bowls cleaned up and blended. Intake ports blended, exhaust ports the same but polished. Basically all casting irregularities removed and cleaned up. New Valves (Polished) Stems checked, all ok. Spring heights checked all ok, New Viton stem seals. Cam was sent to 3-tech for rework and a more eco freindly grind.Rocker lobes were polished. Rocker shafts/oiling tubes were cleaned and polsihed and had new hardware(hold down screws) installed with all staked at top due to the fact that these can occasionally come out.
Image

The crankshaft was light polished and all journals checked by a local machine shop (I didnt have a large enough micrometer). All mains and rod journals fell near perfect within factory manul spec therefore STD main bearings and STD rod bearing were the recommendation. Both Bearing sets were NEW as part of an order from parts dinosaur. As all the old bearings showed very little, wear at all I really did not think they were going to need anything else, but wanted to be sure. New Hastings piston rings were installed. All rings checked for proper end gaps, all fell within factory spec. The plan was to do a DIY Piston balance. However, once fully cleaned and all parts reassembled, ALL 3 pistons weighed in exactly the same, with the scale I had. 690kg was the approx weight of each. #3 piston thrust bearing was in perfect shape, so it was reused. Crank thrust clearance was also within factory spec. All was reasembled. Pan thoroughly cleaned and painted.
Image
Image

New Oil pump, New Water pump.

While doing all this work the other day, a clutter arose at the mouth of my shop. It seems my bastard cat had managed to catch and near kill one of my local ground squirrels (chipmunk). I cant recall how many of these little fellows I've rescued over the years. It took him a few hours of supervising over the crank install, but finally he was back to himself and I put him back outside, no where near the cat of course. Off he ran to the nearest ground hole.
Image

updates to continue.

_________________
Mike
Valley Grande, AL
1986 Sprint plus

Do you maintain a personal fleet like I do?
Why do we do it?
Because it's what we enjoy and because we CAN.
2011 camaro, 2005 Vibe, 2016 Outback, 06 Expedition, 87 Porsche 911, 87 Turbo sprint, 82 Brat, 73 gmc 4x4, 69 camaro, 99 Gl1500 Honda Goldwing, 12 Kawasaki klr650, 2012 Kubota L3200, and we wont even go into the small stuff.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon May 30, 2011 7:53 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 9:07 pm
Posts: 557
Location: alabama
still slow on the resto, but still going. A few improvements.

While reassembling my cyl head I came across a sensor that does not clearly appear in any manual. After a discussion with Phil n Ed, we both feel it is possible that is could be a sensor tied to an idiot light that only comes on when the engine coolant goes over temp. Said sensor was located in the cyl head below and to the right of the distributor.

Image

I did look, but had no luck finding a replacment for this sensor that was not working anyway. That, and I'm a bit old school when it comes to my engine builds. I prefer to see working guages. The sensor hole luckily was a common thread and the taps found in such guage kits as the one I obtained fit nicely.

Image

Image

I did install a new oil sending unit, but as adjacent to said unit there was also a plugged oil passage, why not also have a functional oil pressure guage.

Image

_________________
Mike
Valley Grande, AL
1986 Sprint plus

Do you maintain a personal fleet like I do?
Why do we do it?
Because it's what we enjoy and because we CAN.
2011 camaro, 2005 Vibe, 2016 Outback, 06 Expedition, 87 Porsche 911, 87 Turbo sprint, 82 Brat, 73 gmc 4x4, 69 camaro, 99 Gl1500 Honda Goldwing, 12 Kawasaki klr650, 2012 Kubota L3200, and we wont even go into the small stuff.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Mon May 30, 2011 8:35 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Feb 25, 2011 3:57 am
Posts: 169
Location: garfield,wa
i like this alot :)

_________________
jd


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Jul 06, 2011 9:14 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 9:07 pm
Posts: 557
Location: alabama
Resto still going on. But, house got burglarized a few weeks back. Home laptop and digital camera part of it. Hope to update again soon once the insurance adjuster gets off their asses and settles the claim.

_________________
Mike
Valley Grande, AL
1986 Sprint plus

Do you maintain a personal fleet like I do?
Why do we do it?
Because it's what we enjoy and because we CAN.
2011 camaro, 2005 Vibe, 2016 Outback, 06 Expedition, 87 Porsche 911, 87 Turbo sprint, 82 Brat, 73 gmc 4x4, 69 camaro, 99 Gl1500 Honda Goldwing, 12 Kawasaki klr650, 2012 Kubota L3200, and we wont even go into the small stuff.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 19, 2011 8:48 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Jul 15, 2010 11:27 pm
Posts: 316
Location: KC, Kansas
Dude, sorry to hear some idiot desided to rob you. That's a serious bummer. :shock:

But on a positive note... Nice rebuild! I just found out the other day that the local parts store can order me a used N/A 1.0L 3cyl engine complete for around $1000. Maybe when this thread is done and I get some cash I'll do a hotrod sprint motor. Basically the same thing you've done only diffrent cam, Carb and exhaust.

Stay poistive. The insurance company will come thru. And you'll get even better stuff than what some ass hat stole from you.

_________________
1987 Chevy Sprint base 1.0 3cyl 993cc (R.I.P.)
1986 Chevy Sprint base 1.0 3cyl 993cc (Totaled)
1994 Geo Metro base 1.0 3cyl 993cc (Had to sell)
1996 Geo Tracker 1.6l 16v 4cyl 1590cc (Daily)


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Tue Jul 19, 2011 10:24 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 9:07 pm
Posts: 557
Location: alabama
Thanks for the positive note both on my rebuild and the situation. The insurance finally did settle, but the hell they put us through was about as bad as the thieves. That and of course we didnt get any where near the loss. Yeah we did end out wist some more modern stuff, but some of the stuff they stole had been in my family for near 50+ years. Those items no amount of $ can replace...Posting tonight using my new laptop which is LOTS faster with much more memory.

As for the rebuilt engine for $1000, you can rebuild it yourself for about 1/3 that. Of course its gotta be something you wanna do. But, to me and to many others here, thats part of the fun of it.

I just recently also picked up a 87 turbo model. But for now I Plan to finish this one. Then get on that one maybe come winter.

_________________
Mike
Valley Grande, AL
1986 Sprint plus

Do you maintain a personal fleet like I do?
Why do we do it?
Because it's what we enjoy and because we CAN.
2011 camaro, 2005 Vibe, 2016 Outback, 06 Expedition, 87 Porsche 911, 87 Turbo sprint, 82 Brat, 73 gmc 4x4, 69 camaro, 99 Gl1500 Honda Goldwing, 12 Kawasaki klr650, 2012 Kubota L3200, and we wont even go into the small stuff.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 4:54 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 9:07 pm
Posts: 557
Location: alabama
Time for an update on this build. We finally got our new laptop after the theft and was able to do some photo editing.
when last I left off I was in search of a bottom and side mount for the Automatic transmission. I was able to find a side mount through a person on the forums here. However, on the bottom mount I had no luck anywhere. After much searching on the web, I found that many individuals in similar situations will pour their own. I can attest to the fact that this is one pain in the a** to do. Getting the rubber kit is easy, pouring is easy, but the prep work is serious nasty work. Here you can see the kit I obtain via McMaster Carr. Your lookijng at around $30 for the kit, but considering you cant find the mount, what other choice does one have?

Image

Here is the mount after I had removed all of the nasty rubber and started grinding it prior to layout.

Image

All layed out to size and ready to pour
Image

After the pour and ready and waiting to dry.
Image

The dry time is about 24 hours, but they recommend a few days to cure, heat helps. 3 days out in the 100 deg southern sun was the bake mine got. The 80 hardness grade kit I think is quite a bit stiffer than the OEM rubber was. If I had to do it again I would probably go with a 40 hardness grade. I was going with 80 off of web recommendations. either way, it turned out much nicer than the old rotten one that was in it and un-useable. All other mounts were avail. I Installed all new transmission and motor mounts.

Another common problem that these vehicles have is the Brake Proportioning valve leaking. I don’t think I have ever seen one that is not leaking. I’ve rebuilt a few others in my day, so assumed this one could be done as well. The biggest problem I found was rust on and around the top of the two control pistons. No wonder the previous owner was complaining about the brakes easily locking up.In this pic you will see all the parts that make up this valve. The Orings I installed new ones from a kit I had Buna-n ( Nitrile) which should stand up to brake fluid. The large one on top I reused. It was still soft and pliable with no obvious scratches in the sealing surface. The pistons themselves and they sliders they mount in, I polished nice and smooth then used cold Gun Bluing to lightly treat them so as not to rust again any time soon. Once all was re-assembled I also sealed the lid except for a tiny spot on the front. Worst case it will weep out the front side and not the firewall side. Firewall was sanded, primed and repainted.

Image

Image

While all that was going on I went ahead and dealt with the light corrosion in the battery area. Sanded all that area. Primed, painted, undercoated and painted again.

Image

after that cleaned the entire engine bay. Might as well make the entire project look good.
Image

After all the cleanup work it was time to re-install the transmission along with all the new mounts. The transmission appeared to be working ok prior to engine rebuild. I did pull the pan for inspection and new gasket replacing the filter while in there. All external seals (CV Shaft seals, input torque converter seal, selector shaft seal) were also replaced.

Image

Until next time…….

_________________
Mike
Valley Grande, AL
1986 Sprint plus

Do you maintain a personal fleet like I do?
Why do we do it?
Because it's what we enjoy and because we CAN.
2011 camaro, 2005 Vibe, 2016 Outback, 06 Expedition, 87 Porsche 911, 87 Turbo sprint, 82 Brat, 73 gmc 4x4, 69 camaro, 99 Gl1500 Honda Goldwing, 12 Kawasaki klr650, 2012 Kubota L3200, and we wont even go into the small stuff.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 7:06 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 24, 2006 3:09 pm
Posts: 4998
Location: Palm Springs: Too hot from June to Oct.!
Coming along.

Bit of a chore mating the engine with starter ring to the torque converter and then you have a definite problem with space trying to get that hanging mess to mate and not screw up the input shaft seal.
What I did was assemble the block, starter ring, torque converter and transmission
Image
and then lift the assembly with motor mounts, using a floor jack.
Several years now, and no input shaft leaks.

If you've got an assistant, I can see putting the tranny in, and then dropping in the engine.

_________________
DIY Broken Bolt Removal: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=41042
DIY Clutch Adjustment: viewtopic.php?f=9&t=48281
DIY Wheel Bearings: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=29003
DIY Shocks: viewtopic.php?f=10&t=45483
DIY Wheel Align: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=42479
Once you get the cars dialed-in (compression, leaks, bearings, alignment, brakes) swap in new rubber and glass, you've got something which should last for years!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Jul 21, 2011 8:20 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 9:07 pm
Posts: 557
Location: alabama
Yes it is.....you got a point there. I found that not installing the rear engine mount until after I mate them up makes it a bit easier. One day I plan to install a hoist and do more jobs the way you suggest.

Afterall....I got another one to do in the near future!!
Image

_________________
Mike
Valley Grande, AL
1986 Sprint plus

Do you maintain a personal fleet like I do?
Why do we do it?
Because it's what we enjoy and because we CAN.
2011 camaro, 2005 Vibe, 2016 Outback, 06 Expedition, 87 Porsche 911, 87 Turbo sprint, 82 Brat, 73 gmc 4x4, 69 camaro, 99 Gl1500 Honda Goldwing, 12 Kawasaki klr650, 2012 Kubota L3200, and we wont even go into the small stuff.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Sat Jul 30, 2011 9:48 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 9:07 pm
Posts: 557
Location: alabama
I’ve been working a 96 hour week, so have not had much time for much of anything. But, as it rained my only off day and yard work was out of the question, I did get a few more things done to the sprint. Engine bay is starting to come back together. Block, head and intake are all installed. Valves adjusted, new timing belt and adjuster installed. Radiator was cleaned as best as possible due to previous blown head gasket. No doubt will require through engine flushing once back to running. Radiator was pressure tested to 20psi in a kiddy pool with the only leak being the new radiator cap that is supposed to leak at around 13psi. After testing painted with high heat black.

Image
Image

As I used my new 35amp alternator that came with this car to bring home that 87 turbo model, I decided to buy a new 55 amp for this project. Also shown in this pic is my exhaust header, that was blasted and painted with high heat 1200 deg paint. The heat Shield was repaired where screws had rotted through the cover, it also got painted with high heat paint. New stainless mounting bolts. Ground strap was fixed by installing new ring mounts. Exhaust valve was disassembled, bead blasted, reassembled and vacuum tested. New O2 sensor.

Image

If you’ve followed this build, some pages back I mentioned the installation of true working gauges, Oil pressure, cyl head temp and voltmeter. As these are mods to the original setup, it was necessary to stop engine bay work for a while and make sure all things would fit and not interfere with placement of factory items. This Sprint being the automatic model, has a nice center console that has all sort of cubby holds. The top one had a small tray that popped out and just so happened my small guage cluster fit in this hole near perfect. I will need to install a screw on either side to hold it in place, but other than that no butchering of plastic was needed.

Image
Image

The firewall, just did not have any already available ports by which to gain access to the cabin and t he gauges. The oil Tube and DCV wire are small, but the water temp sensor is quite large. Considering the location of the gauges the most sense was on the lower firewall adjacent to where the Auto trans shift cable is located. Even if I one day I upgrade to manual transmission, this spot will still be ok. In order to make it all water tight, I used a baffled rubber grommet Obtained in any parts house sold in the same area as gauges. Hole diameter was 1 1/8 ”. After sensors are all installed, I’ll seal it around the edge with 3m Weather seal. If need be also light silicone around the actual sensor leads. Here are pics of the firewall penetration points as seen from inside cabin and underneath car.

Image
Image

_________________
Mike
Valley Grande, AL
1986 Sprint plus

Do you maintain a personal fleet like I do?
Why do we do it?
Because it's what we enjoy and because we CAN.
2011 camaro, 2005 Vibe, 2016 Outback, 06 Expedition, 87 Porsche 911, 87 Turbo sprint, 82 Brat, 73 gmc 4x4, 69 camaro, 99 Gl1500 Honda Goldwing, 12 Kawasaki klr650, 2012 Kubota L3200, and we wont even go into the small stuff.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 8:08 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 24, 2006 3:09 pm
Posts: 4998
Location: Palm Springs: Too hot from June to Oct.!
If you are having trouble finding the automatic transmission motor mount which goes on the cross member do a search for
EM-8162; $24 shipped.

_________________
DIY Broken Bolt Removal: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=41042
DIY Clutch Adjustment: viewtopic.php?f=9&t=48281
DIY Wheel Bearings: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=29003
DIY Shocks: viewtopic.php?f=10&t=45483
DIY Wheel Align: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=42479
Once you get the cars dialed-in (compression, leaks, bearings, alignment, brakes) swap in new rubber and glass, you've got something which should last for years!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 7:23 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 9:07 pm
Posts: 557
Location: alabama
Phil,

Thanks for the info and will do. For now the one I rebuilt is in there. But if I can obtain the right one I might just get it for the heck of it. I hope to have the old girl running soon...too many hours at work and constant triple digits on what few off days Ive had, is making working on any project rough these days.

_________________
Mike
Valley Grande, AL
1986 Sprint plus

Do you maintain a personal fleet like I do?
Why do we do it?
Because it's what we enjoy and because we CAN.
2011 camaro, 2005 Vibe, 2016 Outback, 06 Expedition, 87 Porsche 911, 87 Turbo sprint, 82 Brat, 73 gmc 4x4, 69 camaro, 99 Gl1500 Honda Goldwing, 12 Kawasaki klr650, 2012 Kubota L3200, and we wont even go into the small stuff.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Wed Aug 03, 2011 11:04 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 9:07 pm
Posts: 557
Location: alabama
Phil,

I thought that number looked familiar. I had actually ordered 2 of those thinking they were the motor mounts. Ends out they were wrong for that, but I held on to them. Luckly I did find the exact motor mounts. When I found that the trans mount was bad, I pull one of those out of the box and consider using it for the cross member tranny mount. But, the EM8162 is about 1/2" too tall for the application (compared to the old one) After quite a bit more searching, just gave up and went with the pour my own approach. I just last week ended out taking those two EM8162's back to the parts house for refund. Autozone had them for $19.

The only approach I didnt try in more depth was to actually call Westar and another source of motor mounts that had 100's of different kinds and try to match up a similar one based on size. If the one I poured causes problems, that will be my next approach.

_________________
Mike
Valley Grande, AL
1986 Sprint plus

Do you maintain a personal fleet like I do?
Why do we do it?
Because it's what we enjoy and because we CAN.
2011 camaro, 2005 Vibe, 2016 Outback, 06 Expedition, 87 Porsche 911, 87 Turbo sprint, 82 Brat, 73 gmc 4x4, 69 camaro, 99 Gl1500 Honda Goldwing, 12 Kawasaki klr650, 2012 Kubota L3200, and we wont even go into the small stuff.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Aug 04, 2011 10:14 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 24, 2006 3:09 pm
Posts: 4998
Location: Palm Springs: Too hot from June to Oct.!
Thanks for the update.
I posted that part number in case someone else ran into the same problem you had.
Good to know it is the wrong part.

_________________
DIY Broken Bolt Removal: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=41042
DIY Clutch Adjustment: viewtopic.php?f=9&t=48281
DIY Wheel Bearings: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=29003
DIY Shocks: viewtopic.php?f=10&t=45483
DIY Wheel Align: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=42479
Once you get the cars dialed-in (compression, leaks, bearings, alignment, brakes) swap in new rubber and glass, you've got something which should last for years!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2011 5:31 am 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 9:07 pm
Posts: 557
Location: alabama
If I ever find the real deal I'll surely post it. But, as we both know not that many go to the full extreme of a complete restore on a Automatic model. Many dont even want to restore what they have because they paid peanuts for the entire car, just fix it enough so it runs.


I spoke to a coworker the other day that has poured quite a few mounts over the years for custom built cars. He says that if spongier rubber is what we feel we would need for these cars, then go with the weakest durometer grade urethane. Makes sense. I went with what a few sources recommended, but have to admit its pretty stiff. There were 2 grades softer than what I used.

_________________
Mike
Valley Grande, AL
1986 Sprint plus

Do you maintain a personal fleet like I do?
Why do we do it?
Because it's what we enjoy and because we CAN.
2011 camaro, 2005 Vibe, 2016 Outback, 06 Expedition, 87 Porsche 911, 87 Turbo sprint, 82 Brat, 73 gmc 4x4, 69 camaro, 99 Gl1500 Honda Goldwing, 12 Kawasaki klr650, 2012 Kubota L3200, and we wont even go into the small stuff.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2011 12:52 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Tue Oct 24, 2006 3:09 pm
Posts: 4998
Location: Palm Springs: Too hot from June to Oct.!
Once it is up and roadable, use the rear view mirror test.
See if your rear view mirror gives a clear and non-blurry view at highway speeds.

Of course, you are an old salt so this post is mostly for newbies.

(You smell something burning?)
:shock:

_________________
DIY Broken Bolt Removal: viewtopic.php?f=22&t=41042
DIY Clutch Adjustment: viewtopic.php?f=9&t=48281
DIY Wheel Bearings: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=29003
DIY Shocks: viewtopic.php?f=10&t=45483
DIY Wheel Align: viewtopic.php?f=2&t=42479
Once you get the cars dialed-in (compression, leaks, bearings, alignment, brakes) swap in new rubber and glass, you've got something which should last for years!


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Aug 05, 2011 9:54 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Mar 07, 2011 9:07 pm
Posts: 557
Location: alabama
yep...used that approach before.
Hard to stop a shakey mirror sometimes.

info for newbies is what all this is about anyway.

_________________
Mike
Valley Grande, AL
1986 Sprint plus

Do you maintain a personal fleet like I do?
Why do we do it?
Because it's what we enjoy and because we CAN.
2011 camaro, 2005 Vibe, 2016 Outback, 06 Expedition, 87 Porsche 911, 87 Turbo sprint, 82 Brat, 73 gmc 4x4, 69 camaro, 99 Gl1500 Honda Goldwing, 12 Kawasaki klr650, 2012 Kubota L3200, and we wont even go into the small stuff.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 65 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2, 3  Next

All times are UTC - 5 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by phpBB® Forum Software © phpBB Group